Dec 162014
 
chipKIT WF32 Pin Diagram

chipKIT WF32 Pin Diagram

Thanks to Jay at Digilent, the chipKIT WF32 now has an awesome and very useful pin diagram. Note that this diagram is no match for the WF32 Reference Manual; however, used in combination, these two files make getting to know your WF32 board a snap! In addition, two other documentation-type resources that provide even more details about your board include the board definition file and the schematic for each board. Check out Digilent’s blogpost for more details!

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Dec 152014
 
Where to Find chipKIT Board Definitions

chipKIT Board Definitions on Windows

If you have ever wondered why some example sketches “know” what PIN_LED1 means, then you’ll be glad to know that it’s not magic. PIN_LED1 is an example of a shortcut in the board definition file, a file for each board that contains detailed information about the pins on each board. Check out Jay’s Instructable for how to find and use the board definition files on Mac OS X and Windows.

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Dec 082014
 
OpenBCI 32-bit Board Kit (chipKIT)

OpenBCI 32-bit Board Kit (chipKIT™-compatible)

Have you heard? OpenBCI (the open-source brain-computer interface) is a community of researchers, engineers, artists, scientists, designers, makers, and more sharing a passion for harnessing the electrical signals of the human brain and body to further understand its complexities.

OpenBCI’s 32-bit OpenBCI board—a versatile analog-to-digital converter compatible with any type of electrode—is used to sample electrical brain activity (EEG), muscle activity (EMG), heart rate (EKG), and more. This 8-channel neural interface uses a Microchip PIC32MX250F128B 32-bit processor that comes pre-flashed with the chipKIT™ bootloader and the OpenBCI System Firmware. The board communicates wirelessly to a computer via the the OpenBCI programmable USB dongle (based on the RFDuino radio module), and it is also communicate wirelessly to any mobile device or tablet compatible with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE).

OpenBCI is supported by an ever-growing, open-source framework of signal processing applications. They chose the open-source format because they believe that ground-breaking discoveries in the field of brain science will benefit more from an open forum of shared knowledge by people from various disciplines than from companies, institutions, or even the entire field of science itself.

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Dec 042014
 

Imagine the cross between a skateboard and a Segway!

This guy not only imagined it; he built it using a chipKIT Uno32!

Check it out! Get the scoop on how he built this thing on Let’s Make Robots!

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Dec 022014
 

Hello,

I have modified the VirtualWire library originally developed for Arduino in order to be able to run it on PIC32 Microcontrollers. The main changes concern the interruption setup and handling (OC1 and Timer 2).

VirtualWire is a library that provides features to send short messages without addressing, retransmit or acknowledgment, a bit like UDP over wireless, using ASK (amplitude shift keying). It supports a number of inexpensive radio transmitters and receivers. All that is required is transmit data, receive data, and (for transmitters, optionally) a PTT transmitter enable.

For more information, click the following links:

Don’t hesitate to use VirtualWire, and feel free to ask any questions.

Eric

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Nov 252014
 
Digilent Design Contest 2015 - 11th Edition

Digilent Design Contest 2015 – 11th Edition

Are you a student? Do you love contests? Then get ready for the Digilent Design Contest 2015, a hardware design competition with the challenge of developing innovative projects using Digilent products, including chipKIT boards.

For more information about how to participate, please visit: digilentdesigncontest.com

Good luck!

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Nov 242014
 
Power chipKIT with a DC Power Source

Voltage regulators on chipKIT

Ever wanted to power your chipKIT board without having to go through the USB cable (usually plugged into your computer)? Well, there is good news for you. Digilent has a blog post about how you can power your chipKIT without frying it, plus some useful tips.

Happy Powering!

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Nov 102014
 
LabVIEW Interface for chipKIT

LabVIEW Interface for chipKIT is now LINX

Do you use LabVIEW? Well even if you don’t, you might decide to try it once you hear what’s in store for those who do. A relatively new LabVIEW interface called LINX actually supports the chipKIT platform, though support really isn’t such a new thing. As you can see in this post from a year ago, LINX actually started out as LIFCK (LabVIEW Interface For chipKIT).

In more recent news, this post provides a brief summary for how LabVIEW’s LINX and chipKIT together provide students and hobbyists a low-cost DAQ (Data Acquisition) or Control System.

For “Getting Started” material and support, please visit: labviewhacker.com/linx.

Tell us about your data acquisition and measurement projects in the comments!

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Nov 072014
 
MPLAB X IDE Debugging Environment

MPLAB X IDE: In a debugging environment, you can put a breakpoint wherever you want to stop the code from running. On the bottom of the window, you can see the variable tab where you are able to create watch variables. If you create a watch variable, you can see the values change between each step.


If you’re like me, mixing up things that sound alike is not difficult to do. For example, I can easily mix up chipKIT and PICkit, especially if I’m tired and I’m not thinking well. MPIDE and MPLAB IDE are a close second; they just sound too much alike. So it’s not difficult to see that if the names mix you up and you don’t really know that much about either of them, you might wonder what distinguishes the two and why you’d want to use one over the other. For a quick summary of the differences between using MPIDE (Multi-Platform IDE) and MPLAB X IDE check out this MPIDE vs MPLAB IDE blogpost by Digilent.

However, I would like to preface that article with the following points. Since MPIDE was ported from the original Arduino IDE, and since Arduino was meant to be simple and easy to use, there wasn’t a whole lot of functionality built into the IDE from the beginning. It simply works as an editor allowing you to compile your code and program it to your target board (via the bootloader). Debugging was not built into Arduino IDE, but most people use “printf()” statements and the Serial Monitor to help debug their programs/sketches. Microchip’s MPLAB X IDE, however, has always been a debugging environment in addition to being an editor and integrating a compiler.

That being said, good luck not mixing them up now!

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