Jan 242015
 
32-bit chipKIT-based board for the Open-Source Brain Computer Interface

chipKIT-based 32-bit board for Open-Source Brain Computer Interface

Congratulations OpenBCI for showing up on EE Times article “Open Source Hardware Advances Science, Technology” as one of the five items they chose to feature (right up there with the mention of Elon Musk and Tesla’s decision to open up their patents)! Well done!

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Jan 232015
 

Forget about wiring and soldering. StickyBUGs are low-profile and stackable modular boards that let you quickly and easily create your own shields to fit into your space-constrained Arduino® based project. In addition to their small size and pluggable functionality, they automatically handle both 5V and 3.3V systems, so they can be used with the chipKIT™ embedded platform.

Learn more on the Kickstarter page!

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Jan 222015
 

chipKIT Uno32 Development Board

chipKIT Uno32 Development Board

Take a deep dive into the hardware of the chipKIT Uno32 in this #ThrowbackThursday post that features a March 2012 article from our friends at Nuts & Volts Magazine. Fred Eady, the author, talks about the Arduino hardware model, describing it as “a perfect example of a universal electronic cluster design.” Eady discusses the serial USB interface in depth, and also examines and explains the schematics for powering the chipKIT Uno32 board. Finally, he ends with a deep dive into the Basic I/O Shield, the code libraries that give this board functionality, and the reasoning behind abstraction of the library code.

To read it all download the full article and enjoy!

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Jan 122015
 
chipKIT IoT and Ubidots Cloud

View your chipKIT variables via the Ubidots Cloud

The chipKIT™ embedded platform is a great starting point for developing Internet of Things applications. But how do you store and work with the data that your application collects? With the cloud-based Ubidots platform, you can collect and store your data as “dots.” Every time your device sends a value to their cloud, a “dot” is created. Ubidots offers a free “Maker Plan” which allows you to collect 30,000 “dots” per month.

To get you started, they have created some chipKIT-based application tutorials:

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Jan 052015
 
Local Temp from chipKIT and Raspberry Pi published to Exosite Cloud

Local Temp from chipKIT and Raspberry Pi published to Exosite Cloud

The tutorial we’re sharing today is a follow-on post to the Local Temp with chipKIT and Raspberry Pi post, and is an example of how you can take the previous tutorial to the next level.

So, you’ve collected the temperature data via the chipKIT uC32 and the Basic I/O Shield, you’ve sent the data to the Raspberry Pi, but now what do you do with it? This tutorial will show you how to take that data and publish it to the cloud, the Exosite cloud to be sure! For more information on how to create your own IoT application, see a previous post about Exosite, a company that makes connecting devices, networks, and users a breeze via their cloud-based data platform.

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Dec 292014
 
How to connect a PICkit 3 programmer, leaving the Power Jack and USB port accessible

How to connect a PICkit 3 programmer, leaving the Power Jack and USB port accessible

Did you know that chipKIT boards can also be used as generic embedded controllers? In addition to MPIDE or UECIDE, chipKIT-compatible boards can be programmed in several other IDEs, using programming languages such C, C++, Pascal or Basic. When using another IDE such as MPLAB X, the chipKIT bootloader may become erased or over-written. Which is fine, if you plan to stick with that environment.

If your bootloader has been erased, and you want to use MPIDE or UECIDE again, you’ll need to restore the chipKIT bootloader. A new guide has been released, with step-by-step instructions and lots of pictures. To learn more, download the full guide here.

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Dec 292014
 
Local Temperature from chipKIT uC32 & Basic I/O Shield sent to Raspberry Pi and displayed on screen via Python

Local Temperature from chipKIT uC32 & Basic I/O Shield sent to Raspberry Pi and displayed on screen via Python

The tutorial we’re sharing today shows you how to take temperature readings via chipKIT uC32 (or Uno32) and the Basic I/O Shield, and send this information to Raspberry Pi, where the sky is the limit with the things you can do. In this particular example, you can display the temperature readings in the GUI via a Python script.

Find the tutorial and more information on the RedAcacia blog.

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Dec 222014
 
Cheap Robots chipKIT Line-Following Robot

Simple Line-Following Robot

In a previous post, you may have seen Marc’s version of a line-following robot using a chipKIT Uno32 and an Arduino Motor Shield (among other things), but if you haven’t had enough of robots or you’re new to robotics, check out this other line-following robot by Jay from Digilent using a chipKIT DP32! This example is particularly nice because it’s perfect for robotics beginners as it is quite inexpensive to build. The robot chassis is actually made of cardboard (so it doesn’t get much cheaper than that), no motor shield is required either, and instead of buying line sensors, you can make your own.

Enjoy!

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Dec 162014
 
chipKIT WF32 Pin Diagram

chipKIT WF32 Pin Diagram

Thanks to Jay at Digilent, the chipKIT WF32 now has an awesome and very useful pin diagram. Note that this diagram is no match for the WF32 Reference Manual; however, used in combination, these two files make getting to know your WF32 board a snap! In addition, two other documentation-type resources that provide even more details about your board include the board definition file and the schematic for each board. Check out Digilent’s blogpost for more details!

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