Nov 102014
 
LabVIEW Interface for chipKIT

LabVIEW Interface for chipKIT is now LINX

Do you use LabVIEW? Well even if you don’t, you might decide to try it once you hear what’s in store for those who do. A relatively new LabVIEW interface called LINX actually supports the chipKIT platform, though support really isn’t such a new thing. As you can see in this post from a year ago, LINX actually started out as LIFCK (LabVIEW Interface For chipKIT).

In more recent news, this post provides a brief summary for how LabVIEW’s LINX and chipKIT together provide students and hobbyists a low-cost DAQ (Data Acquisition) or Control System.

For “Getting Started” material and support, please visit: labviewhacker.com/linx.

Tell us about your data acquisition and measurement projects in the comments!

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Nov 072014
 
MPLAB X IDE Debugging Environment

MPLAB X IDE: In a debugging environment, you can put a breakpoint wherever you want to stop the code from running. On the bottom of the window, you can see the variable tab where you are able to create watch variables. If you create a watch variable, you can see the values change between each step.


If you’re like me, mixing up things that sound alike is not difficult to do. For example, I can easily mix up chipKIT and PICkit, especially if I’m tired and I’m not thinking well. MPIDE and MPLAB IDE are a close second; they just sound too much alike. So it’s not difficult to see that if the names mix you up and you don’t really know that much about either of them, you might wonder what distinguishes the two and why you’d want to use one over the other. For a quick summary of the differences between using MPIDE (Multi-Platform IDE) and MPLAB X IDE check out this MPIDE vs MPLAB IDE blogpost by Digilent.

However, I would like to preface that article with the following points. Since MPIDE was ported from the original Arduino IDE, and since Arduino was meant to be simple and easy to use, there wasn’t a whole lot of functionality built into the IDE from the beginning. It simply works as an editor allowing you to compile your code and program it to your target board (via the bootloader). Debugging was not built into Arduino IDE, but most people use “printf()” statements and the Serial Monitor to help debug their programs/sketches. Microchip’s MPLAB X IDE, however, has always been a debugging environment in addition to being an editor and integrating a compiler.

That being said, good luck not mixing them up now!

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Nov 062014
 
chipKIT WF32 Development Board

chipKIT WF32 Development Board

Exosite has put together an open-source example application and library to help you create your own IoT application using either the chipKIT WF32 standalone or the chipKIT uC32 and chipKIT WiFi Shield together. Their example code and library show you how to access the Exosite cloud.

Check out Exosite’s support post with all the details!

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Nov 032014
 
Hackaday: chipKIT O-Scope Plotter

Live long and prosper – Drawing in the XY mode of an O-Scope

So many chipKIT projects, so little time! At least that’s what Jacob Christ probably thought, but as he taught his microcontroller class at MtSac, he remembered that one project he always wanted to do! What’s that you say? Why drawing in the XY mode of the oscilloscope, of course! So, armed with a chipKIT Fubarino SD and a Microchip MCP4902 DAC, Jacob and students together made art on the o-scope. Sounds too cool to pass up right? To learn how to do it yourself or to see just how they did this, check out the Hackaday post!

May your art and creativity live long and prosper!

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Oct 312014
 

Happy Halloween to you ghouls and goblins from the latest, coolest Kickstarter, called tweeq, a micro-sized, Arduino-compatible platform based on chipKIT! At smaller than an M&M, most of these boards fit on the tip of your finger, and yet there is so much potential to make great things with them! Why not give them a gander and give ‘em a quid or two; they have various pledge quantities, but hurry! There’s only one month left to show your support!

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Oct 312014
 
Digilent Halloween Contest Entry - Human Jukebox

Digilent Halloween Contest Entry – Human Jukebox

As part of Digilent’s Halloween Design Contest, Sam and Tommy posted their “Human Jukebox” entry on Instructables. This thing is pretty neat, using among other things, the chipKIT uC32, a 1sheeld, and conductive paint (way cool!).

Enjoy!

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Oct 292014
 

This project may look like a cute little remote-controlled car, but it is far more than that; it is a GPS-guided autonomous car. Give it some way points and away it goes! FUBAR Labs member Jason put this together using a chipKIT Max32. Read more about how this car was built on the summary page for this project.

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Oct 282014
 
Instructables: chipKIT Dice Roller

A fun way to roll the dice

Now there’s a new fun way to roll the dice! With this Instructables tutorial, you can see how to take a chipKIT Uno32 or a chipKIT uC32, LEDs, a pushbutton, and some 3D printed parts to make this. It’ll be the talk of the town at your next boardgame event!
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Oct 272014
 
Digilent using Fritzing to show a button and LED circuit with chipKIT Uno32

Using Fritzing to show a button and LED circuit with chipKIT Uno32

Fritzing! Some of you may have heard of it, some of you might not have, but maybe you’ve seen images like the above. Whether you know about Fritzing or not, you might want to check out Digilent’s blogpost because you might learn something new about Fritzing and chipKIT that you didn’t already know.

Having said that, you might also want to check out Fritzing’s website, where some of the chipKIT boards have already been added and tagged with ‘chipKIT’ in the Projects section. Since Fritzing is all about open-source hardware, you could download any one of the available chipKIT boards and add it to “My Parts” in the Fritzing app, then do with it as your little heart desires.

Happy Fritzing!

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