chipKIT Drum Set with MikroE Clicks

chipKIT: TouchClamp Click Drum Machine

Drum sets are fun to play! Now you can make your very own noise (or shall we say ‘music’) maker, and all without soldering a thing. All you need are a handful of bottles and cans (which will act as the drum pads) with some alligator clip wires (clips on both ends) connected to a chipKIT Uno32 via an Arduino Uno click shield and two MikroElektronika click boards with audio and touch sense capabilities. The TouchClamp click acts as the input for the drumming, and the MP3 click provides the audio for each “drum.” A clever little idea, we thought.

Why not make some noise with your own drum set. For all the details, check out the chipKIT drum set tutorial!

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Timer Interrupts on the chipKIT DP32

Timer Interrupts on the chipKIT DP32
Timer Interrupts on the chipKIT DP32

Have you ever needed your code to run repeatedly after a very precise amount of time?

In this tutorial, Jay explains how to accomplish this task by setting up a timer and connecting an interrupt to it. This project utilizes a chipKIT DP32, but a WF32 or uC32 would work as well.

See all the details on the Instructables tutorial.

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Using a chipKIT WF32 and a Raspberry Pi to set up fan control for XBOX

Fan Control Using WF32 and Raspberry Pi
Fan Control Using WF32 and Raspberry Pi

Has your XBOX ever overheated due to excessive use? If so, have you ever wondered what you can do to stop it?

In a fan-control project–developed by Austin Stanton after his XBOX 360 died–this is exactly the issue he is trying to correct. Once he finished grieving for his lost gaming system, Austin was able to focus on how to fix the problem so that his next system doesn’t die. After doing some research, he suspected his entertainment system was the culprit, not allowing enough heat to escape.

Austin decided that the best way to regulate the temperature was to regulate the airflow, which he achieves by using two fans and a servo; the servo was positioned so it would open a door (to increase airflow). A chipKIT WF32 monitors temperature and operates the fans, while a Raspberry Pi was controls the WF32 over Wi-Fi by means of two switches.

Pretty good sleuthing on Austin’s part, I’d say! You can check out the details on the Digilent blog, where his project is broken down into two posts. The first one describes how to set up fan control using LabVIEW, and the second one describes how to add a Raspberry Pi to the whole thing.

Good luck with all your DIY life hacks!

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Trophy for chipKIT WF32 Controlled iPad Mount for the Sight Impaired!

chipKIT Controlled iPad Mount for the Sight Impaired
chipKIT WF32 Controlled iPad Mount

In a Digilent-sponsored senior design competition, Kaitlyn Franz’s team won a second place trophy for their project. The team created a Wi-Fi controlled iPad mount for assisting the sight impaired to find lost items. To accomplish this, the team utilized a chipKIT WF32, which has a Wi-Fi capable PIC32 microcontroller on board.

To check out more details, head over to Digilent’s Blog.

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